Brooklyn Population
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For many households in Brooklyn, it’s no exaggeration to say that half their income goes to rent. In most community districts, a little less than a third of the households are paying 50 percent or more of their incomes to rent. Putting away such a large portion of their earnings into housing makes it harder for these households to save. 
The burden falls heaviest on Brooklyn’s less affluent districts, as those districts with lower median incomes also tend to have higher proportions of households paying 50 percent or more in rent.
Check community district numbers in the map from “English Classes Needed" to find where neighborhoods fall in the chart. Visit the About page to learn about the underlying data. 

Click the graph to enlarge (slightly)

For many households in Brooklyn, it’s no exaggeration to say that half their income goes to rent. In most community districts, a little less than a third of the households are paying 50 percent or more of their incomes to rent. Putting away such a large portion of their earnings into housing makes it harder for these households to save. 

The burden falls heaviest on Brooklyn’s less affluent districts, as those districts with lower median incomes also tend to have higher proportions of households paying 50 percent or more in rent.

Check community district numbers in the map from “English Classes Needed" to find where neighborhoods fall in the chart. Visit the About page to learn about the underlying data. 

English Classes Needed

Like the rest of New York City, Brooklyn enjoys brilliant diversity, a trait New Yorkers rightly celebrate. Many households are in desperate need of English language learning services, however. Overall, 18 percent of households in Brooklyn didn’t have anyone age 14 or older who checked that they can speak English “very well” in the 2007-2009 American Community Survey by the U.S. Census Bureau. In four community districts, a third or more of households don’t have English-speaking adults.

Adults who don’t speak English well may have trouble working with their children’s teachers; understanding public announcements, such as subway route changes and severe weather warnings; enrolling their families in benefits they qualify for and consenting to medical procedures. They are barred from higher education in the U.S. and most well-paying jobs.

Multilingual consent forms and park signs help with many of the challenges non-English-speakers face. But for the long-term benefit for the family, adults need access to English language classes.

Click on a community district to learn more. Visit the About page to learn about the underlying data.

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Stories and numbers about Brooklyn

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